Marilyn Nance, USA Contingent FESTAC ’77 Closing Ceremony. Image courtesy the artist.

Returns

October 13—19, 2017

What does it mean to return—to a cultural history, to a movement, and to the site of Africa in developing an artistic language?

Taking place from October 13 through 19, 2017, Returns considers the aesthetic and sociopolitical ramifications of Pan-Africanist movements of the early to mid-20th century, which sought to garner connectedness and solidarity among Africans on the continent and those of African descent living internationally. Returns features conversations that unpack the different meanings and uses of the term Pan-Africanism across the diaspora, looking to the ideas spearheaded by prominent scholars such as Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. Du Bois, Aimé Césaire, Kwame Nkrumah, and Léopold Sénghor. With a particular focus on activities in Chicago, Returns also explores trends of Afrocentrism in artistic practices and social movements in the city from the 1960s into the 1970s, alongside reflections on the global Pan-African cultural festivals of the era including FESTAC ’77.

Returns evolves in two chapters. The first chapter takes place October 13 through 15, 2017 with the participation of educator Abdul Alkalimat, scholar Romi Crawford, author and educator Haki R. Madhubuti, scholar Dominique Malaquais, artist and writer Naeem Mohaiemen, photographer Marilyn Nance, and filmmaker Floyd Webb.

The second chapter features a public roundtable discussion with post-colonial theorist Françoise Vergès on October 19, 2017.

Returns extends conversations from the conference Black Arts International: Temporalities & Territories—a weeklong exploration of the art and scholarship of the black diaspora taking place from October 9 through 14, 2017 at Northwestern University.

October 13

6:30pm
Logan Center Performance Penthouse

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=informazioni-viagra-generico-200-mg-a-Roma Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat

Rethinking the concept of return, Abdul Alkalimat, scholar and co-founder of the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC), maps major historical events and key cultural producers in Chicago that have connected the city to Africa and the global Pan-African movement, including a visit by the first prime minister and president of Ghana Kwame Nkrumah to Chicago in the 1950s as well as the work of individuals and collectives such as Margaret Burroughs, Ishmael Flory, AfriCOBRA, and the Sun Drummers.

October 14

12:45pm
Logan Center Screening Room

click here Welcome by Yesomi Umolu, Logan Center Exhibitions Curator and Bill Michel, Executive Director of UChicago Arts and the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts

1-2:45pm
Logan Center Screening Room

http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=100mg-female-viagra FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu

This panel explores the major Pan-African festivals of arts and culture that took place in the 1960s and 1970s. Scholar and curator Dominique Malaquais shares her research and curatorial work on festivals in Senegal, Algeria, and Nigeria. Reflecting on the impact of Pan-Africanism on the development of the Black Arts Movement in Chicago and the US, scholar, author, and educator Haki R. Madhubuti and photographer Marilyn Nance share their personal experiences at FESTAC ’77, the largest Pan-African festival, held in Lagos, Nigeria.

3-4:45pm
Logan Center Screening Room

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=acquistare-viagra-generico-100-mg-consegna-rapida-a-Venezia Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford

This panel considers the everyday politics and geopolitical dimensions of Pan-Africanism. Filmmaker Floyd Webb reflects on his involvement with radical social groups in Chicago and his subsequent contact with liberation movements on the continent in the mid-1970s. Turning to the iconic figure of Muhammad Ali, who cultivated an internationalism that connected Black America with Africa and the Muslim Third World, artist and writer Naeem Mohaiemen considers the misgivings and misrecognitions of the famed boxer’s travels to Bangladesh in 1978.

4:45-5pm
Logan Center Screening Room

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=comprare-vardenafil-Bologna Closing remarks by Yesomi Umolu

October 15

2pm
Stony Island Arts Bank, 6760 S. Stony Island Ave, Chicago

Film Screenings: The First World Festival of Negro Arts (1968) and The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)

Initiated by the former President of Senegal and leading Pan-Africanist Léopold Sénghor, The First World Festival of Negro Arts (FESMAN) took place in Dakar, Senegal in 1966. With the participation of over 45 countries, the festival showcased visual art, music, literature, dance, and film from across the diaspora. William Greaves’ film captures the spirit of the event and provides unparalleled insight from the perspective of the African American delegation. Based on the 1969 novel of the same title, The Spook Who Sat by the Door is an example of “blow-back” film intended to show the consequences of covert operations. Set in Chicago, the film chronicles the struggles of the Central Intelligence Agency’s first black agent, who eventually leaves the CIA and trains Chicago’s black youth to become Freedom Fighters. The screenings are followed by a small reception.

Presented in partnership with Black Cinema House.

October 19

6pm
Logan Center Terrace Seminar Room

elk elk problems from accutane use Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès

Drawing on her writings and extensive research on postcoloniality, racism, and the work of Pan-Africanist scholars such as Aimé Césaire, post-colonial theorist Françoise Vergès leads a discussion on the origins of Pan-Africanism and considers its contemporary manifestation in the culture and politics of the African diaspora.

Presented in partnership with the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT).

Contributors

http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=buy-best-price-generic-levitra-professional Abdul Alkalimat (Gerald A. McWorter) is a founder of the field of Black Studies and author of many books and papers about Black liberation. He wrote the first college textbook, Introduction to Afro-American Studies, which has seen seven editions, the last one free and online. A lifelong scholar-activist with a PhD from the University of Chicago, he has lectured, taught, and directed academic programs across the US, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, and China. Two of his early contributions were serving as chair of the Chicago chapter of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, and co-founding the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC) in 1967. He was an executive committee member of the African Liberation Support Committee, and a founder of the Black Radical Congress. He was the North American coordinator for the Seventh Pan-African Congress held in Uganda in 1994. Raised in Chicago’s Cabrini Rowhouses, he is now professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

prezzo viagra generico 50 mg pagamento online a Roma Romi Crawford, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Visual and Critical Studies and Liberal Arts Departments at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research focuses on formations of racial and gendered identity and their relation to American visual arts, film, and popular culture. Recent curatorial projects include The Wall of Respect; Vestiges, Shards, and the Legacy of Black Power and Radical Relations! Memory, Objects and the Generation of the Political. She makes regular contributions to publications on contemporary art and American culture, including Theaster GatesBlack Archive (2017) and “Do For Self: The AACM and the Chicago Style” in Abigail Satinsky, ed.Support Networks (2014). She is coauthor (with Abdul Alkalimat and Rebecca Zorach) of The Wall of Respect: Public Art and Black Liberation in 1960s Chicago (2017). In 2016 she founded the Museum of Vernacular Arts, a project-based platform for art forms that are part of everyday experience.

see Marilyn Nance has produced exceptional photographs of the United States and the African Diaspora. A two-time finalist for the W. Eugene Smith Award in Humanistic Photography, her work can be found at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Library of Congress. Nance’s photographs have been published in The World History of PhotographyHistory of Women in Photography, and The Black Photographers Annual.  Nance has been awarded the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Photography (1989 and 2000) and Nonfiction Literature (1993), and the New York State Council of the Arts Individual Artists Grant (1987). A graduate of New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, Nance served as Curator of Photography for the first Digital Schomburg Web Project. Additionally, Nance holds a BFA in Communications Graphic Design from Pratt Institute and a MFA in Photography from the Maryland Institute College of Art. She is the matriarch of the art collective, The Santana Project. As an alumna of NYU’s tech courses, Nance has created an extensive archive of upwards of 1,500 FESTAC ’77 images.

go here Haki R. Madhubuti is an award-winning poet, essayist, and educator; one of the architects of the Black Arts Movement; and founder and publisher of Third World Press and Third World Press Foundation, both founded in 1967. He is the author of over thirty books of poetry and nonfiction including YellowBlack: The First Twenty-One Years of a Poet’s LifeLiberation Narratives: New and Collected Poems 1967-2009Honoring GeniusGwendolyn Brooks: The Narrative of Craft, Art, Kindness and Justice; and the best-selling Black Men: Obsolete, Single, Dangerous?: The Afrikan American Family in Transition. A longtime community activist and institution builder, Madhubuti is cofounder of the Institute of Positive Education as well as three schools in Chicago. He retired in 2011 after a distinguished teaching career that included Cornell University, Howard University, University of Iowa, and Chicago State University as well as DePaul University where he served as the Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor. Madhubuti’s most recent book is Taking Bullets: Terrorism and Black Life in Twenty-First Century America.

Buy Clomiphene 25mg online pharmacy Dominique Malaquais is a Senior Researcher at CNRS (Institut des Mondes Africains, Paris, France) and codirector of the experimental curatorial platform SPARCK (Space for Pan-African Research, Creation and Knowledge). Her work addresses intersections between political contestation and the making of urban cultures in the late capitalist era.  Ongoing and recent projects include PANAFEST Archive, which centers on the political and social (after)lives of Pan-African arts and culture festivals of the 1960s and 70s; Highway Africa, which focuses on key infrastructure and urbanism projects developed between the 1960s and the early 21st century; and Yif Menga, a two-year, multiscalar artist-scholar dialogue focusing on urban performance art as political project. Recent publications include two edited volumes: Afrique-Asie: arts, espaces, pratiques (2016), comprising reflections on Africa-Asia exchanges as effected through the visual arts, literature, urbanism, and spirituality, and Archive (re)mix (2015), a collection of essays on the production of art, visual and textual, as an exercise in exploring archival materials and techniques. Upcoming and recent exhibitions include Kinshasa: Urban Chronicles and Dakar 66: Chroniques d’un Festival Panafricain.

http://acrossaday.com/?search=levitra-is-there-a-generic Naeem Mohaiemen combines films, installations, and essays to research failed Left Utopias, incomplete decolonizations, and tragic misrecognitions of allies, such research framed by the movements of Third World Internationalism and World Socialism. The work has shown at the Sharjah, Marrakech, and Venice Biennales, MUAC Mexico City, New Museum, Tate Britain, MoMA, Kiran Nadar, Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy, and Documenta 14 (Athens / Kassel). Essays include “Fear of a Muslim Planet: The Islamic Roots of Hip-Hop” (Sound Unbound: Sampling Digital Music and Culture, 2008), Traitors, a Mutable Lexicon (e-flux Supercommunity, August 8, 2015), “All That is Certain Vanishes into Air: Tracing the Anabasis of the Japanese Red Army” (e-flux Journal #63, March 2015), and “The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Campaign” (Assuming Boycott: Resistance, Agency, and Cultural Production, 2017). He is a PhD candidate in Historical Anthropology at Columbia University, researching left histories outside of state patronage.

Françoise Vergès is a political theorist and the Chair of Global South(s) at the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris as well as an independent curator and a longtime feminist, anti-racist, anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist activist. Growing up in Réunion Island in an anti-colonial and feminist family, she learned quite early about repression, censorship, and racism. Moving to France, she became a journalist for the journal Des Femmes en movement (1975-1983) and the editor of the collection “des femmes en lutte dans tous les pays” (women fighting in every country) for the publishing house Des femmes while being active in anti-racist and anti-imperialist movements. Vergès moved to the United States in 1983 where she worked before returning to school. She received her PhD at University of California at Berkeley (1995). After returning to Réunion Island for a project of a “museum without objects,” she served as president of the French National Committee of the Memories of Slavery. Vergès has published extensively on postcoloniality, creolization, living memories of slavery, Frantz Fanon, Aimé Césaire, race, and feminism. She has also directed two movies on the great Caribbean authors Aimé Césaire and Maryse Condé and organized guided visits at the Louvre on slavery.

Floyd Webb was born in Clarksdale, Mississippi and raised on Chicago’s South and West sides. As a child, his curiosity about Africa was all-consuming. This interest in the continent and Pan-Afrikanism led him to Africa in 1975, when he journeyed to Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania and the coast of East Africa. He has continued to visit and work in Africa—in Zanzibar, Nigeria, Ghana, Congo, Mali and Burkina Faso. Webb’s background includes global work in cinema, photojournalism, publishing, and advertising. Webb’s film, digital, and creative works include: producer for Paris-based Effervescence Production’s Future Mag series for France Arté (2014); consultant for The March (2013), director John Akomfrah’s film, produced by Robert Redford, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington; producer of 3-D animation effects for Wesley Snipes’ Amen Ra Films; producer of a documentary featuring Egyptologist Josef Ben Jochanna; associate producer of the award-winning Julie Dash film Daughters of the Dust (1992); local producer of the American Masters film The World of Nat King Cole (2006); and producer and director of music videos, short documentaries, and 3-D animation projects.

Media

Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Chicago’s Africa: Identity, Scholarship and Politics, a lecture and conversation with Abdul Alkalimat. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

FESTAC ’77 and Other Pan-African Festivals with Marilyn Nance, Haki R. Madhubuti, and Dominique Malaquais, moderated by Yesomi Umolu. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Afrocentrism, Vernacular Cultures and Social Movements with Naeem Mohaiemen and Floyd Webb, moderated by Romi Crawford. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Film Screenings at Black Cinema House. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Film Screenings at Black Cinema House. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Film Screenings at Black Cinema House. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Film Screenings at Black Cinema House. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Film Screenings at Black Cinema House. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas

Roundtable discussion with Françoise Vergès. Photo by Jaclyn Rivas